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  • Posted on October 13, 2017
    Wading through Mendota’s Mysteries

    Lake Mendota is called the most studied lake in the world, but we still don’t have a clue. Katherine (Trina) McMahon and her team are exploring its microbial dark matter for answers.

  • Posted on June 20, 2017
    Class Act: Sam Schmitz and Big discoveries in little worlds

    There are still some mysteries left in the world—even if, as Sam Schmitz has learned, you sometimes have to dive pretty deep to find them. […]

  • Posted on
    Experts in “Smart Energy”

    A new one-year master’s degree at CALS fills a needed niche helping companies with energy analysis and conservation

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    “Interwoven tapestry” of lakes and land: Iceland

    Swarms of midges rise out of a lake in northern Iceland in such enormous numbers every spring and summer that they can impair breathing and […]

  • Posted on July 1, 2016
    Safer Nanotech

    A CALS researcher is investigating the biological impacts of nanomaterials

  • Posted on March 4, 2016
    For the Birds

    A new version of the Wisconsin Breeding Bird Atlas draws on the increasing power
    of citizen science

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    Age-Old Traditions, New Media

    Life sciences communication professor Patty Loew fosters intercultural learning with workshops that help tribal teens tell their stories in a digital world.

  • Posted on November 3, 2015
    The New Old Forest

    Clear-cutting in past centuries left Wisconsin with very few old-growth forests—and fewer of the environmental benefits they provide. CALS has partnered with the DNR and other institutions on a long-term project to learn how such forests can be reestablished and sustainably used.

  • Posted on
    Bitten

    When it comes to mosquitoes, nobody wants to be attractive

  • Posted on June 9, 2015
    Eyes on the Green

    How CALS scientists help the world-renowned Whistling Straits golf course get ready for this summer’s PGA Championship

  • Posted on
    The MBA of Dairy

    A CALS partner program trains aspiring—and much-needed—farmers

  • Posted on
    The Fox, the Coyote­—and We Badgers

    Growing populations of these animals on campus and in the city have inspired a new study aimed at living better together