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  • Posted on February 25, 2019
    In the Field | Alumni Making Their Mark as Entrepreneurs

      Katherine BS’08 and Tyler BS’08 Rowe For Katherine (Kate) and Tyler Rowe, the most influential part of their CALS experience was their Horticulture 122 […]

  • Posted on October 16, 2017
    Kernza: Perennial Crop with Perks

    Agricultural systems have a major role to play in feeding the world while protecting the planet, and Valentin Picasso looks to new crops and new techniques that can further this monumental task.

  • Posted on October 5, 2016
    From Space to the Field

    Farmers are testing a new technology that can help them better predict crop yields

  • Posted on July 1, 2016
    More Sustainable Feedstock for Ethanol

    Perennial crop yields can compete with corn stover, study suggests

  • Posted on June 19, 2014
    Made for the Shade

    New technology could help food crops thrive in crowded fields

  • Posted on
    25th for CIAS: Looking Back, Looking Ahead

    The Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems continues blazing trails

  • Posted on March 6, 2014
    Ag Science for Kids

    Learn about soybeans with “Coolbean”

  • Posted on
    Looking for “hotspots”

    Researchers see promise in clusters of farmers who are willing to grow crops for biofuels

  • Posted on June 18, 2013
    The Value of GMOs

    A long-term study sheds light—and numbers—on benefits to farmers

  • Posted on
    Seeding an Organic Future

    CALS students and faculty are in the forefront of efforts to develop plant varieties for a burgeoning market

  • Posted on February 15, 2013
    South of the Colorful Clouds

    China’s Yunnan province, home to some of the world’s most remote and distinctive ecological communities, is facing growing pressure to develop with the rest of the country. A UW–Chinese collaboration run through CALS sends researchers to explore how best to preserve biodiversity and foster sustainable livelihoods in the region.

  • Posted on October 12, 2012
    Coping with the Climate

    For Wisconsin farmers dealing with wild swings in weather, adaptation is the key.