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  • Posted on March 8, 2024
    The Fate of Microbes and Carbon in the Aftermath of Wildfires

      In Controlled Burn (Grow, fall 2018), Erik Ness introduced readers to the Charcoalator, a small furnace that sustains tiny fires under controlled conditions. Associate […]

  • Posted on April 29, 2022
    The Quest for Self-Fertilizing Crops

      In the fall 2020 issue of Grow, Eric Hamilton highlighted a team of CALS scientists and their search for alternatives to synthetic crop fertilizers. […]

  • Posted on February 25, 2021
    Answers Await on the Ocean Floor

      It’s December 2018. Karthik Anantharaman awakens at 6 a.m., afloat in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. He’s barely slept, adrenaline is flowing. There’s […]

  • Posted on March 7, 2018
    Gut Dwellers

    CALS scientists delve into the microbial communities in our digestive tracts — and their implications for our health

  • Posted on October 16, 2017
    Beyond Antibiotics

    More than half a century ago, the advent of antibiotics transformed medicine. Today, the slumping performance of these drugs is spurring new treatment innovations.

  • Posted on February 20, 2017
    Gut Reactions

    Garret Suen’s study of microorganisms involved in herbivore digestion holds promise
    for human health and our environment

  • Posted on November 20, 2013
    Meat, With a Touch of Fruit

    Protecting organic meats from deadly bacteria calls for developing new antimicrobial
    agents from natural sources

  • Posted on
    An Astonishing World Revealed

    Microbes inhabit our bodies by the trillions, yet how they benefit us mostly remains a mystery. As scientists work with animals to illuminate that complex dynamic, they are excited about the potential microbes may hold for human health.

  • Posted on
    Growing Our Future

    As you read the feature stories in this edition of Grow, I invite you to consider how they reflect the mission, vision, guiding principles and […]

  • Posted on June 18, 2013
    Protecting our Pollinators

    Bees, so crucial to our food supply, are dying off at alarming rates. CALS researchers are taking a close look at everything from the microbes in their hives to the landscapes they live in to identify in what conditions bees thrive.

  • Posted on November 19, 2010
    Small Wonder

    Should Wisconsin honor its hardest-working bacterium?

  • Posted on April 2, 2009
    Something to Sneeze At

    Newly completed genome may reveal cold viruses’ weaknesses.